Gluten Free Cookies

These cookies are open to your own imaginative interpretation. Try butterscotch chips and toasted salted pecans, or white chocolate and cranberries, in place of the chocolate chips.

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Beat the butter, sugars, vanilla and salt till fluffy.
  2. Beat in the eggs one at a time, being sure to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl midway through to make sure everything is well combined.
  3. Whisk together the flour or flour blend, xanthan gum, baking powder, and baking soda.
  4. Beat the dry ingredients into the butter mixture, then blend in the chocolate chips and nuts. Again, scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl to be sure everything is well blended.
  5. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for 1 hour, or for up to 2 days.
  6. Preheat the oven to 350Β°F. Lightly grease a couple of baking sheets, or line with parchment.
  7. Scoop tablespoon-sized balls of dough onto the prepared baking sheets; a tablespoon cookie scoop works well here. Leave space between the cookies so they can spread.
  8. Bake the cookies for 9 to 11 minutes, until golden brown. Remove from the oven and let rest on the baking sheets for 5 minutes, to set, before transferring to racks to cool completely. Or allow them to cool right on the baking sheets.
  9. Yield: 3 dozen cookies
  10. *Make your own blend
    One of my favorite brands of gluten free flour is King Arthur. which includes ingredients that reduce the grittiness sometimes found in gluten-free baked goods. Our flour also increases the shelf life of your treats, keeping them fresh longer. 

    The following make-at-home blend, featuring stabilized brown rice flour, works pretty well when substituted; and it tastes better than a blend using regular brown rice flour. 

    Whisk together 6 cups (28 1/2 ounces) King Arthur stabilized brown rice flour; 2 cups (10 3/4 ounces) potato starch; and 1 cup (4 ounces) tapioca flour or tapioca starch. Store airtight at room temperature. Note: You can substitute white rice flour for the brown rice flour if you like; it'll make your baked goods grittier (unless you manage to find a finely ground version).